Nautilus

Why a Post-Nuclear World Would Look Nothing Like “Mad Max”

Mad Max: Fury Road envisions an embarrassing, nightmarish future. Worldwide droughts have driven humanity to nuclear war over water, destroying modern civilization, and disfiguring the earth into a planet-spanning Sahara. Decrepit old goons control the last remaining pockets of groundwater and arable land; essentially, the movie is one drawn-out, violent chase scene through a sterile and withered landscape. Entertaining, for sure. But could such drastic desertification really happen on Earth?

One of the few aquifers left, operated by the grisly warlord Immortan Joe. He tantalizes the local population by showering

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