Nautilus

Steal a Skull, Understand a Genius

 

The skulls of three famous composers: Schubert, Haydn, and Beethoven. Can you match the skull with the musical style of its owner?

On May 31st, 1809, famed composer Joseph Haydn died, and he was soon buried in a simple ceremony—but his peaceful rest would not last long. Five days after his interment, a friend of his dug up his body and cut off his head. Joseph Carl Rosenbaum kept a detailed dairy chronicling his theft, noting that when he got into the carriage after severing the head, it smelled so bad that he almost vomited. It wasn’t until 11 years

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