Nautilus

Strange Eyeless Fish Creates Its Own Sonar Signals to “See”

The blind cavefish alongside two of its sighted relativesImage Courtesy of NYU

Deep in some pitch-black, underwater caves in Mexico, there lives a peculiar little pinkish-white fish. Only about four inches long, this albino has taste buds on the outside of its lower jaw, sleeps very little, and, most interestingly, has no eyes. 

This blind fish (Astyanax mexicanus) evolved relatively recently from a surface fish that does have eyes and lives in the nearby river systems. At some point between a half a million and five millions years ago, some

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