Nautilus

Can Remnants of Ancient Life Show Us How to Live Wisely Into the Future?

At long-term nuclear repositories in Finland and Sweden, waste will be ensconced in cast-iron inserts (right), which are then placed in copper canisters (left).Posiva Oy

This is part 2 of Vincent Ialenti’s report on how how to think about nuclear waste in the environment over the very long term. Also see part 1, which ran on Facts So Romantic yesterday.

In the next decade, nuclear-waste experts in Finland and Sweden hope to build the world’s first-ever long-term storage repositories for spent nuclear fuel*. To keep this dangerous, high-level waste from leaking over the many thousands of years during which it will remain active, the repositories will rely on four main barriers: First, used-up nuclear

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