Nautilus

More Sex Talk from the Love Scientist

 

Doris Day and Rod Taylor face off in a scene from the 1965 movie Do Not Disturb.Photo by Camerique/Getty Images

 

Last month in my Nautilus interview with love scientist Helen Fisher, we had a good time parrying over the value of viewing sex and romance in the pixels of a brain scan. Usually, she says, her friends and acquaintances, as well as journalists, want to talk about “the basics.” Just the other day, she says, “I spent a good deal of time with a person who is deeply attached to one woman and madly in love with another. He’s married to the first one, and was asking me how to solve their personal love problems. Those are the kinds of things people always ask me.”

So Fisher, a biological anthropologist and Senior Research Fellow at the Kinsey Institute, and the chief scientific advisor to Match.com, welcomed the opportunity to debate her findings about the chemistry of love, and have some fun with me over my skepticism. In our previous interview, Fisher talked about the science behind her popular Nautilus essay, “Casual Sex May Be Improving America’s Marriages.” She discussed what we learn about each other between the sheets and just how underrated those benefits with friends can be. Our tete a tete below features questions and answers that didn’t make the cut the first time around, but which continue her insights into how people get stuck in the

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