Nautilus

The Tragedy of Iran’s Great Salt Lake

This classic Facts So Romantic post originally ran in August, 2014.

The last time my cousin Houman traveled to Lake Urmia was 11 years ago. He and four of his friends piled into his car and drove for roughly 12 hours, snaking west from the capital of Tehran. Iran is shaped like a teapot; its massive saltwater lake is nestled high in the tip of its spout and flanked by the mountains that run along the Turkish border to the west.

They had heard a lot about it. The largest

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