Nautilus

There’s Plenty of Space for One Trillion More Trees

Gregor Hintler had what seemed like a simple question: How many trees are there? As part of Plant for the Planet, a youth initiative that aimed to plant one billion trees in every country by 2020, he needed a way to figure out how many trees the planet could fit. But when he tried to find out, he realized nobody knew the answer. One estimate suggested 400 billion trees. “That sounds like a lot,” he recalls thinking. “Could be right.” But Hintler, who was then a graduate student in environmental management at Yale University, started looking at data from plots in Germany

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Nautilus

Nautilus5 min readWellness
A Window on Africa’s Resilience
We called Greg Carr the other day to talk about the spread of the coronavirus in Africa. Carr, who has been featured in Nautilus, is the founder of the Gorongosa Restoration Project, a partnership with the Mozambique government to revive Gorongosa Na
Nautilus3 min readSelf-Improvement
Most of the Mind Can’t Tell Fact from Fiction
Stories, fiction included, act as a kind of surrogate life. You can learn from them so seamlessly that you might believe you knew something—about ancient Greece, say—before having gleaned it from Mary Renault’s novel The Last of the Wine. You’ll also
Nautilus4 min read
Why COVID-19 Flare-Ups Will Keep Happening: Like earthquakes and forest fires, outbreaks have a “heavy tail” of large events.
We all want to get back to our lives—go out for a drink, see a movie, hug our parents and grandparents, and bring our cities back to life. When will the virus be under control? And how do we measure that? Much of the media coverage of COVID-19 talks