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What Earth Tells Us About Life, Intelligence & the Universe

 

An artist’s conception of Earth alongside Kepler-69c, Kepler-62e, and Kepler-62f, three of the most Earth-like, potentially habitable planets yet discovered.NASA

Astrobiology, the study of life on other worlds,  is one of the coolest sciences ever.  From extremophile bacteria living miles underground and feeding off radioactivity to exoplanetary systems with bizarre head-spinning architectures, astrobiology includes some of the most amazing parts of the natural world.  But for some hardened naysayers, Astrobiology’s glamour is tainted by that small problem that it doesn’t really have a subject yet.  When it comes to the issue

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