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Medical Terms That Still Bear the Mark of the Third Reich

Dr. Hans Reiter achieved the one thing most likely to keep a physician’s name in textbooks forever: He got an illness named after him. While working as a medic in the German army in World War I, he once treated a case of simultaneous inflammation in the joints, eyes, and urethra. This became known as Reiter’s syndrome.

But after his death in 1969, Reiter was revealed to be a

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