Nautilus

Iron Curtain of the Mind—Our Tangled Thoughts on Geography

An East German border guard keeps a lookout for people trying to escape from communist Berlin to freedom on the other side of the wall. US National Archives

How well do we know the countries we call home? It seems obvious that travel and study would improve a person’s knowledge of geography. But could attitudes about politics also affect your mental map of the world?

Psychologist Claus-Christian Carbon, of the

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