Bloomberg Businessweek

“HOLLYWOOD”

Studios were set for a jump in China’s quota on U.S. films this year. Then came President Trump | “There is a disconnect between what Trump…might want to do and what Hollywood wants”

Anousha Sakoui, with Jeanne Yang

During a visit to Los Angeles five years ago this month, China’s Xi Jinping gave Hollywood a much needed shot in the arm. The incoming Chinese leader agreed to ease an almost 20-year-old quota on American films, nearly doubling both the number of U.S. movies imported to China and Hollywood studios’ share of the box-office receipts—a deal that temporarily settled a World Trade Organization case the U.S. brought against China.

There was an understanding that in 2017 the two nations would return to the table to increase the compensation to U.S. moviemakers and for China to open its market further. But

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek4 min readPolitics
A Bitter Pill for Democrats on Health Care
Democrats are engaged in a vigorous debate about how to achieve their goal of universal health-care coverage. Moderates such as Joe Biden want to enhance the existing Affordable Care Act with a “public option.” Progressives like Bernie Sanders and El
Bloomberg Businessweek3 min readPolitics
The New Old Tools of Protest
After the Sudanese military toppled dictator Omar Hassan al-Bashir in April, it turned its attention to a new opponent: protesters demanding a civilian government. In a bid to cut off activists’ ability to communicate with one another and the outside
Bloomberg Businessweek13 min read
Battle Of The Bubbles
LACROIX WAS ONCE THE DARLING OF SPARKLING WATERS. TODAY IT’S STRUGGLING AGAINST A CROWDED MARKET AND A RAFT OF LAWSUITS