Bloomberg Businessweek

“HOLLYWOOD”

Studios were set for a jump in China’s quota on U.S. films this year. Then came President Trump | “There is a disconnect between what Trump…might want to do and what Hollywood wants”

Anousha Sakoui, with Jeanne Yang

During a visit to Los Angeles five years ago this month, China’s Xi Jinping gave Hollywood a much needed shot in the arm. The incoming Chinese leader agreed to ease an almost 20-year-old quota on American films, nearly doubling both the number of U.S. movies imported to China and Hollywood studios’ share of the box-office receipts—a deal that temporarily settled a World Trade Organization case the U.S. brought against China.

There was an understanding that in 2017 the two nations would return to the table to increase the compensation to U.S. moviemakers and for China to open its market further. But

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek15 min readTech
How Yale Got Crazy Rich
David Swensen built a $29 billion fortune for his university and revolutionized investing. What’s wrong with that?
Bloomberg Businessweek1 min read
Steel Magnolia
Abstract expressionist John Chamberlain took the gestural force of Jackson Pollock’s paintings and rendered it in three dimensions. His most famous sculptures—mammoth car doors and hoods bent and crushed into submission—are almost by definition grand
Bloomberg Businessweek3 min read
India’s Auto Boom Goes Bust
It’s hard to escape the influence of the auto industry in Chennai, a city in southern India known as the nation’s Detroit. Schoolyards have billboards proclaiming they’re “supported by” big carmakers such as Daimler, Renault, and Nissan Motor. Even t