Popular Science

In war, it's not just your allies that matter—their allies matter too. And so do theirs.

Friends of friends of friends are basically friends
South Korean Marines in Mongolia

Hilda Becerra, U.S. Marine Corps, via Wikimedia Commons

South Korean Marines in Mongolia

The marines are training for peacekeeping operations.

The friend of my friend is probably not my enemy. At least, that’s the finding from Ohio State political scientist Skyler Cranmer, together with co-authors Caitlin Clary, Aisha Bradshaw, and Weihua Li. Nations with formal alliances tend to remain at peace, naturally, but according to the study published last week, it’s not just that the allies themselves who play nice.

“We looked at how a country

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Popular Science

Popular Science5 min read
Twenty More Smart Commands To Use With Your Amazon Echo
From speakers to microwaves, Amazon is pushing out more Alexa-enabled hardware devices, and their smart assistant continues to become more responsive. Keep up with the updates and try these 20 new voice commands to use on your Amazon Echo, and add th
Popular Science7 min readFood & Wine
Eight Tasty Berries You Can Find In The Wild
Wild berries are a great introduction to foraging. Do you know about foraging? According to the latest research, many of the fruits and vegetables available in the supermarket once grew wild and unsupervised—and people used to go out of doors to harv
Popular Science4 min read
The Best Water Bottles For Staying Hydrated
We all know how staying hydrated, especially during the summer, is important. Carrying a water bottle with you is probably the easiest way to make sure to drink more water. It makes refilling your water on a long day easy, and you’ll never have to sp