Popular Science

Some corpses may mysteriously heat up after death

A strange case-study from the Czech Republic
feet in a morgue

Bodies are supposed to cool down to the temperature around them after death ... but some reports suggest that doesn't always happen.

One morning, in a hospital in the Czech Republic, a 69-year-old man died of heart disease. An hour later, as nurses were preparing to move his body down to the lab for autopsy, they noticed his skin was unusually warm. After calling the doctor back to make sure the man was really dead (he was), they took his temperature. At 1.5 hours after death, the body was 104 degrees Fahrenheit—about five degrees hotter than it was before he died, even though

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