NPR

The Foxfire Book Series That Preserved Appalachian Foodways

Foxfire started as a class project at a Georgia high school in the '60s, but soon became a magazine, then a book, and even a way of teaching about the region's simple, self-sustaining way of life.
In an image from the first Foxfire book, students in 1969 look on as Hobe Beasley, John Hopper and Hopper's wife suspend a hog for finishing the work of scalding and scraping. Source: Courtesy of The Foxfire Fund, Inc.

The 1,500-mile Appalachian Mountain range stretches so far that those on the northern and southern sides can't agree on what to call it: Appa-LAY-chia or Appa-LATCH-ia. The outside perspective on the people who live there might be even more mangled. Stories about Appalachia tend to center around subjects like poverty, the opioid epidemic and coal, but since 1966 a series called Foxfire has been sharing food, culture and life as it's actually lived in the mountain region.

Foxfire started as a class project at a Georgia high school — students interviewed neighbors

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