NPR

Kids Who Suffer Hunger In First Years Lag Behind Their Peers In School

When infants and young kids grow up in homes without enough to eat, they're more likely to perform poorly in kindergarten, a study shows. The younger they experienced hunger, the stronger the effect.
A new study shows that when infants and young children grow up in households without enough to eat, they are more likely to perform poorly at school years later. Source: Daniel Fishel for NPR

Growing up in a hungry household in the first couple of years of life can hurt how well a child performs in school years later, according to a new study.

An estimated 13.1 million children live in homes with insufficient food, according to the most recent figures from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Many of those children experience hunger during their first few years of life, or their parents are hungry and stressed out about food during those years – the most crucial time for a child's development.

The new study, published in the latest issue of the journal Child Development, suggests that such

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