Popular Science

Watch a 1953 nuclear blast test disintegrate a house in high resolution

Footage may or may not contain a flying toilet.
Operation Upshot-Knothole Annie Nuclear Test

Video still, public domain footage from Los Alamos National Laboratory

Operation Upshot-Knothole Annie Nuclear Test

Civil Defense looked at how houses fared in nuclear blasts, to plan for possible survival after an attack.

On March 17th, 1953, a nuclear blast threw something out of the second story floor of a house built on the Nevada Proving Grounds. The test, dubbed “Annie”, was part of the larger Operation Upshot-Knothole, served two purposes: the military wanted to test new weapons, for possible inclusion in the United States’ arsenal, and Civil Defense wanted to learn what, exactly, a nuclear blast could do to a house. The lessons from these and other tests influenced decades of

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