NPR

In China, Like In The U.S., The Fight Over Ride Hailing Is Local

Until recently, migrant workers, lured by bonuses, drove for China's largest Uber-like service. But some local governments banned out-of-town drivers, apparently to protect local jobs and curb growth.
Wang Fei, 35, from southwest China's Chongqing region, drove cars for Didi Chuxing, China's main ride-hailing service, from last July until January, when new local rules banned out-of-town cars and drivers, and Didi cut bonuses to drivers. Source: Anthony Kuhn

On the fringes of Beijing, surrounded by affluent housing compounds and the headquarters of some of China's leading hi-tech firms, there's a slum folks call Didi Village.

Cars with mainly out-of-town license plates are parked under makeshift shelters, outside crowded, ramshackle dwellings.

Many of the village's inhabitants are migrant workers who, until recently, worked for Didi Chuxing, China's largest ride-hailing service.

One of them, 35-year-old Wang Fei, started driving last July. Back then, he recalls, Didi and its main competitor, Uber, were locked in a price war. They were offering

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