The Atlantic

The Geography of U.S. Productivity

Cities and the energy belt are the most productive economic regions in America. What does that mean for the rest of the country?
Source: Carlos Barria / Reuters

From 2007 to 2016, productivity in the U.S. grew at about 1 percenta historically low rate. In other recent periods, it’s been much higher: 2.6 percent from 2000 to 2007 and 2.2 percent in the 1990s. The divergence has left economist looking for answers about slumping productivity and how to fix it.

A host of reasons have been suggested for why productivity has been declining: slowing innovation, inefficiency in sectors that have become huge, inability to adequately measure innovations on the internet

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