NPR

'Brave New Workers': A Burning Desire To Get A Medicinal Marijuana License

What happens to workers when an industry fails, new technology takes off? NPR brings you stories of Americans adapting to a changing economy. This week: Leaving the black cannabis market to go legal.
Malcolm Mirage and sister Nina Parks operate the cannabis business Mirage Medicinal in San Francisco. Source: Marissa Ortega-Welch

California native Malcolm Mirage's dream was to own a legal cannabis dispensary. For years, he had grown marijuana and sold it on the black market, while working a day job as a personal trainer. But in his late 20s, Mirage decided it was time to jump into the growing legal industry — before it got too crowded — and build his expertise into a sustainable, above-board business.

In order to open up that business, which he calls Mirage Medicinal, he needed to come up with $500,000 in startup capital, so Mirage began to scale up his operation, expanding into lucrative

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR5 min read
Portraying Celia: The Role Of A Lifetime (Or Two)
How do you inhabit the world's most well-known Latin singer? For singers and actresses Aymée Nuviola and Jeimy Osorio, playing Celia Cruz meant staying in touch with pain, joy and destiny.
NPR2 min read
For A Black Woman In The Military, Harassment Was Its Own Battle
At StoryCorps, retired Col. Denise Baken says the challenges she faced as both a woman and an African American in the Army weighed her down over time, mentally and physically.
NPR6 min read
U.N. Report Links Soil Degradation To Climate Change
Scientists revealed that the Earth's soil is being lost 10 to 100 times faster than it is forming.