Popular Science

Human flesh isn't very nutritious

Prehistoric cannibals likely had other motivations
eating

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Why were prehistoric humans occasionally cannibalistic? A new study sheds some light.

Hannibal Lecter may have eaten a census taker’s liver with fava beans, but according to a new study in the journal Scientific Reports, it wasn’t for the calories. The study found that humans are far less nutritious (as defined by energy bang for your buck) than mammoth, boar, or even a modest beaver.

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