Popular Science

Why it's not partisan to march for science

Facts don’t speak for themselves
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NASA

In 1950, General Douglas MacArthur asked the president for permission to drop 34 atomic bombs in the Korean War. While his request was denied, he continued to defend the proposal for years after, arguing in a 1954 interview that “between 30 and 50 atomic bombs” would have brought the conflict to a hasty conclusion.

At that time, few of our military or political leaders grasped the implications of nuclear war. President Truman called the atomic bomb “the greatest achievement of organized science in history.” President Eisenhower said he saw “no reason why [atomic bombs] shouldn’t be used just exactly as you would use a bullet or anything else.”

Scientists, however, had a very different

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