Popular Science

New study asks how your favorite doggos came to be

The most extensive evolutionary map of dog breeds ever made
dogs

Pexels

Dogs: We love them. Like, a lot. In fact, humans have been hanging out with doggos for at least 15,000 years or so, and likely a lot longer. Over the course of that long, mutually beneficial friendship, we've done a lot of strange things to our four-legged companions, controlling their reproduction to coax them into breeds that suit our (sometimes absurd) needs.

While all pups are members of the same species (Canis lupus familiaris, descended from the gray wolf), we've created more than 350 distinct varieties to date (to say nothing of the increasingly popular labradoodles and their hybrid ilk). By selecting traits that make dogs better at

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Popular Science

Popular Science6 min readSociety
Apple Watches And IPhones Want To Track Your Period To Make Reproductive Health Better For All
The goal is to gain insight on sub-clinical conditions—women’s health issues that don’t quite fit into a tidy diagnosis, or aren’t severe enough to receive one—so physicians can offer relief. But what happens to the data otherwise?
Popular Science3 min read
Hurricanes Really Are Becoming More Destructive
As devastating as these events were, meteorologists don’t all agree on whether storms are indeed growing stronger, or if there’s just more people living on the coast, where they are vulnerable to the powerful winds and rain. But a new study finds tha
Popular Science3 min read
The Sun Can Help Break Down Ocean Plastic, But There’s A Catch
A recent study in the Journal of Hazardous Materials found that when four different types of post-consumer microplastics collected from the waters of the North Pacific Gyre were placed under a solar simulator, they dissolved into organic carbon.