NPR

Fasting Studies Clash With Our Desire To Eat What We Want, When We Want It

Fasting every other day is no better for losing weight or keeping it off than restricting calories every day, a study suggests. And it's yet another example of how hard it is to study fasting.
It turns out it's difficult to get people to adhere to the various dietary restrictions that come with participating in a fasting study. Source: Xsandra

A new study suggests that skipping meals is difficult.

Obviously, right?

The study published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine did not set out to investigate the hardships of abstaining from food. The main question was: Is alternate-day fasting more effective for weight loss and weight maintenance compared with daily calorie restriction?

The answer to that question appears to be "No." The study of 100 people over the course of one year suggests that fasting every other day is no better than restricting calorie intake every day for people trying

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