Popular Science

How drone swarms could help protect us from tornadoes

Eyes in the sky
storm drone

Illustration of the MARIA drone, releasing dropsondes to measure conditions within a storm.

Jamey Jacob/Oklahoma State University

Tornadoes tore through much of the Midwest and Southern U.S. this weekend. More than a dozen people were killed, and the trails of destruction stretch from Texas to Maryland.

Tornadoes aren't just dangerous because of their sheer power: they're also extremely difficult to predict. On average, weather monitors give us only

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