NPR

A Public University Acquires A Big For-Profit, And Raises Big Questions

Some 32,000 students from the for-profit Kaplan University will join Purdue University in Indiana as part of a deal announced recently.
Purdue University President Mitch Daniels Source: Mark Wilson

In a move that's being called "bold" and "out of the blue," Indiana's Purdue University is acquiring the for-profit Kaplan University. In announcing the deal last week, Purdue President Mitch Daniels said it was designed to open the university up to a vast new pool of students nationwide.

"We cannot honor our land-grant mission in the 21st century without reaching out to the 36 million working adults, 750,000 of them in our state, who started but did not complete a college degree, and to the 56 million Americans with no college credit at all."

Kaplan U's 32,000 students will transition to a new

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