Newsweek

In Rural Siberia, the Hospital Comes to You

Once a year, people in rural Russia look forward to getting expert health care—at their local railway station
Patients wait for medical treatment and laboratory results on the Saint Lukas medical train, which stopped in the remote town of Kuragino, Russia, on November 13, 2016. The train comes about once a year to each town on its route.
05_19_SiberianHealthClinicTrain_01 Source: Emile Ducke

The Saint Lukas train doesn’t accept passengers—it accepts only the sick. The Saint Lukas is one of five government-funded medical trains that travel to remote towns in central and eastern Russia. Each stop lasts an average of two days, and during that time the doctors and nurses on board provide rural populations with basic medical care, X-ray scans, prescriptions and referrals to seek specialist help.

“People started queuing to make an appointment

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Newsweek

Newsweek12 min read
Sebastian Kurz Remaking Europe's Future From Dark Past
Young Austrians see themselves in their 32-year-old chancellor, Sebastian Kurz, a conservative populist with big ambitions. In championing him, they also flirt with the country’s dangerous past.
Newsweek13 min readPolitics
Will Donald Trump’s Booming Economy Go Bust?
The stock market is booming, unemployment is at its lowest since 1969, and consumer confidence is high. “The economy is soooo good,” President Trump claimed. So why are his approval ratings in the toilet? Here’s what lies beneath the numbers.
Newsweek2 min read
Photographer Eva Sereny Captured Sets Of Iconic Films
Sereny was one of the only female set photographers in the ’70s, and worked with every major director, from Bernardo Bertolucci to Steven Spielberg.