Popular Science

These scientists made 2,879 tiny clay caterpillars and hid them all over the world

It's a bug-eat-bug world
fake inchworm

A fake inchworm, sculpted from children's modeling clay, sits on a leaf in Hong Kong, waiting for predators to bite.

Chung Yun Tak

Humans aren’t the only creatures who flock to tropical areas. In general, biodiversity increases the closer you get to the equator. That’s somewhat obvious—just think how many more plants and animals live in the rainforest than in the Arctic. But what’s not obvious is how that latitudinal

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