NPR

Face-To-Face Sleep Education Plus 'Baby Boxes' Reduces Bed Sharing

The two-pronged approach to promoting safe sleep led to a 25 percent drop in the risky practice of bed sharing with babies in the first eight days of life, a study found. But more research is needed.

Giving new moms face-to-face education about safe sleep practices — and providing them with a cardboard "baby box" where their newborns can sleep right when they get home — reduces the incidence of bed sharing, a significant risk factor for SIDS and other unexpected sleep-related deaths, a study from Temple University in Philadelphia has found.

The study is the first to show that a face-to-face education program, coupled with the distribution of baby boxes — which come with a firm mattress and fitted sheet — help reduce risky sleep habits

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