NPR

When Plants, Not Meat, Come First

When reducetarians meet, they eat plants and talk community, says anthropologist Barbara J. King. She reflects on taking part in the first Reducetarian Summit.
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Last Saturday, I took part in the first Reducetarian Summit on the campus of New York University in Greenwich Village.

Panel discussions and interaction with the audience — not "sage on the stage" lectures — were the main events of the summit.

As often happens for me, in the midst of trying to process insights coming fast and furiously, my brain grabbed hold of one simple utterance, held on fast, and build connections from there: Lunch should be an academic subject for our children.

Speaking about food in our schools, Richard McCarthy, of Slow Food USA, talked about how — instead of being rushed through the lunch line — kids could be taught about what to eat and where food comes from. They could

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