The Atlantic

The Hidden Women in Astronomy Research

An analysis of thousands of scientific papers dating back to 1950 shows female researchers are cited less frequently.
Source: Jeff Mitchell / Reuters

The citations found at the end of research papers serve several purposes, like providing background on the current work and giving proper credit where it’s due. They can also, according to a new study, reveal decades’ worth of trends in whole fields of science.

A trio of researchers have waded though more than half a century of research published in astronomy journals and found that studies authored by women receive 10 percent fewer citations than similar studies written by men.

Neven Caplar of the Swiss university ETH Zurich and his colleagues analyzed more than

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