The Atlantic

Why Do Coptic Christians Keep Getting Attacked?

Egypt’s preexisting climate of pro-Islamist sectarianism is an important, and sometimes overlooked, reason.
Source: Mohamed Abd El Ghany / Reuters

Friday is usually the most peaceful day in the Egyptian week, a day most often reserved for time with family. This Friday in particular—the last day before the start of Ramadan—should have been a time of calm reflection and prayer in Egypt. Instead, gunmen killed at least 24 Coptic Christians as they made their way via bus to a monastery in Minya, south of Cairo.

Copts are the largest Christian group in the Middle East, and they represent about 10 percent of the population in Egypt. This is not the first attack that has taken aim at Christians in the country

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