NPR

Crude Oil Begins To Flow Through Controversial Dakota Access Pipeline

"Just because the oil is flowing now doesn't mean that it can't be stopped," said Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault II. Tribes and environmental groups have fought against the pipeline.
Police move through the camp of protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, N.D., in February. Despite months of protests by Native American tribes and environmental groups, crude oil is now flowing through the pipeline. Source: Angus Mordant for NPR

Crude oil is now flowing through the Dakota Access Pipeline, despite months of protests against it by Native American tribes and environmental groups.

The pipeline spans more than 1,000 miles from North Dakota to Illinois and cost some $3.8 billion to construct

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