Bloomberg Businessweek

KICK IT WITH YOUR COLLEAGUES

HOW TO THROW A PARTY WITHOUT GETTING HR INVOLVED ON MONDAY

“Work party” might be the most oxymoronic phrase in the English language. Can you really host people at your home after spending all day reviewing PowerPoint presentations with them? Yes! The extended Etc. team did it recently (see previous page)—and even had fun. So can you, as long as you follow a few rules that don’t always apply in other social situations. Get ready to get down with that crazy crew from accounts payable.

HAVE SOME MANNERS

Do’s and don’ts of playing host. By Arianne Cohen

Do: Invite everyone But if that’s just not feasible, contact invitees on their personal email or by text, says Lizzie Post, co-author of Emily Post’s The Etiquette Advantage in Business. “Let them know, ‘Hey, please don’t talk about it at work,’ ” she says. Pro tip: Ask about dietary restrictions in the invite.

Do: Be the one who answers the door—not your partner

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