The Guardian

Maigret, Morse, Poirot: none of them will help you crack a case in real life | Andrew Martin

The Met is inviting graduates to train as detectives without plodding the beat. Let’s just hope these high-flyers don’t take their cues from crime fiction
Rowan Atkinson as Inspector Maigret. ‘He tends to come to the right solution after drinking large quantities of white wine.’ Photograph: Colin Hutton/PR Image

The Metropolitan police are offering graduates resident in London the chance to train as a detective without first having to go on the beat in uniform. The good news for the Met is that, with crime fiction being so popular, they will surely be inundated with applicants. The bad news is that, with crime fiction being so popular, some of those applicants might be thinking in somewhat unrealistic terms.

The call might seem to come from Southampton Row police station, where DCI Jane Tennison works in Prime Suspect, or

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