NPR

Hey Higher Ed, Why Not Focus On Teaching?

Stanford's Carl Wieman won a Nobel Prize for his groundbreaking work in quantum mechanics. With a new book, he continues his efforts to spark systemic changes in how universities teach science.
Illustrated portrait of Nobel Laureate, Carl Wieman Source: LA Johnson

Stanford physics and education professor Carl Wieman won a Nobel Prize for his innovative, break-through work in quantum mechanics. Wieman has since levered the prestige and power of that prize to call attention to the need to transform undergraduate teaching, especially science education.

Wieman's message, as we've reported here and here, is bold: Too many undergraduate programs fail to focus on teaching effectiveness or even bother to try to measure it. As he sees it, undergraduate Higher Ed still worships at the old false idol called the Big Lecture and doesn't seem to want to ask whether it's working.

His solution: Systemically improve teaching through methods that have become known as active learning. Wieman's been interested in effective teaching strategies for years. He argues that a well implemented active learning approach can substantially improve understanding and retention of the material and boost attendance and course satisfaction, among other improvements. His new book is Improving How Universities Teach Science

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