Futurity

How artificial intelligence can teach itself slang

Christopher Manning designs algorithms that can teach themselves evolving uses of language. In this interview, he explains why that's important.

Christopher Manning specializes in natural language processing—designing computer algorithms that can understand meaning and sentiment in written and spoken language and respond intelligently.

His work is closely tied to the sort of voice-activated systems found in smartphones and in online applications that translate text between human languages. He relies on an offshoot of artificial intelligence known as deep learning to design algorithms that can teach themselves to understand meaning and adapt to new or evolving uses of language.

Andrew Myers of Stanford University recently spoke with Manning, professor of computer science and of linguistics, about this work, which is only now starting to gain wider public awareness.

The post How artificial intelligence can teach itself slang appeared first on Futurity.

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