The Guardian

Ruff justice: Chinese city institutes 'one dog policy'

Owners with more than one canine in Qingdao must give others to an adoption agency under controversial new law
Certain canines are seen as status symbols, and trends come and go, sometimes leading to a glut of a once-popular breed. Photograph: Kim Kyung-Hoon/REUTERS

For decades, China harshly enforced its one-child policy through forced abortions and hefty fines. Now the government in one Chinese city is seeking to exert control over another segment of the population, limiting households to one dog each.

The eastern city of Qingdao, a coastal beach town renowned as the

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