NPR

High Court Strikes Down Law Favoring Unwed Mothers Over Unwed Fathers

The Supreme Court struck down a federal law that treats unwed fathers and mothers unequally — a major victory for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who has battled the discriminatory rule for decades.

The U.S. Supreme Court has struck down a federal law based on what the justices called "stunning stereotypes" — among them that most men care little about their children born out of wedlock.

Under the law, a child born abroad to an unwed American mother automatically becomes a U.S. citizen if the mother previously lived in the U.S. for a period of at least one year.

In contrast, the child of

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