Bloomberg Businessweek

Why a Visa Crackdown Is Bad for Business

Without seasonal foreign workers, many small businesses can’t stay open
With visa restrictions forcing the restaurant to close, business at the Pentagoet is way down

Kate Bridges should be waiting tables right now. She’s been a server at the lauded farm-to-table restaurant at the Pentagoet Inn in Castine, Maine, for six years, making enough during the summer season to carry her through the year. But in early June she was answering the phone at the inn, telling callers that the restaurant was closed for the foreseeable future.

“We depend on that income,” she says. “If the restaurant doesn’t open, I don’t know exactly what I’ll do. But if we don’t have cooks, then we don’t have a restaurant.”

The Pentagoet is the oldest continually running business in the tiny

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