The Atlantic

Finding Faith in Democracy at Moments of National Conflict

A scholar of American history argues that unwavering commitment to republican values can turn the nation’s differences into a profound strength.
Source: Yuriko Nakao / Reuters

For David Moss, author of Democracy: A Case Study, history provides a guide for coping with disagreement in a nation as vast as the United States. “Robust faith in the democracy itself has the power to transform our differences from a potentially grave weakness into a precious source of strength,” he writes, drawing on an insight that great American statesmen have expressed from the beginning:

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