Newsweek

Trump's Twitter Fingers on the Grassy Knoll

America’s most powerful conspiracy theorist will soon decide the fate of secret documents about the ultimate conspiracy theory: the Kennedy assassination.
President John F. Kennedy, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy and Texas Governor John Connally ride through Dallas moments before Kennedy was assassinated on November 22, 1963.
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He has called global warming a hoax, suggested that Barack Obama is not an American and linked autism to childhood vaccinations. And soon, President Donald Trump—America’s most powerful conspiracy theorist—will decide the fate of more than 113,000 pages of secret documents about the ultimate conspiracy theory. No, not Russian meddling in the 2016 election—the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963.

Ever since JFK was shot and killed on that fateful Friday afternoon in Dallas, theories have abounded about who really did it. The Russians? The Cubans? The CIA? During the 2016 campaign, Trump even claimed, without evidence, that the father of his Republican rival Ted Cruz might have been involved.

Now, on the year marking the 100th anniversary of Kennedy’s birth, Trump will have to decide whether highly anticipated secret JFK assassination files can be released in October as planned. By law, federal agencies such the CIA and FBI may contest the release of these records, but in that case, the president would make the final call.

Newsweek has learned that the files are twice as voluminous as previously estimated. Metadata analysis of the government’s JFK database reveals the coming files contain more than 113,000 pages of material, ranging from trivial to sensational. This trove will likely illuminate many of the events leading up to Kennedy’s murder in 1963 and other pivotal parts of the Cold War between the U.S. and the Soviet Union.

Related: The CIA's Secrets About JFK, Che, and Castro Revealed in New Book By Former Operative

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