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A Total Eclipse Will Sweep The U.S. In August, And People Are Going Nuts For It

NASA says a partial eclipse will be visible throughout the country. But within a "path of totality" from Oregon to South Carolina, an eclipse industry is booming.
A map of the United States shows where and how much of the eclipse will be visible, including path of totality from Oregon to South Carolina. Source: NASA

On Monday, Aug. 21, a solar eclipse will be visible across America. The last time the contiguous United States saw a total eclipse was 1979, and it will be the first coast-to-coast solar eclipse in 99 years, reports The Associated Press.

A partial eclipse will be visible throughout the United States, according to NASA. But within a band that the agency is calling the "path of totality" stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, viewers will witness a total eclipse. And in many of those places, an eclipse industry is already booming.

The mayor of Hopkinsville, Ky., says his town has spent more than half a million dollars preparing for the event since learning 10 years ago that the area

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