NPR

'Game Of Thrones' Finds Fans Among Disability Rights Activists, Too

Several main characters in the HBO series happen to have disabilities. "I had never seen my own experience in life reflected so accurately, so vividly, so viscerally," says one disability activist.
Isaac Hempstead Wright plays Bran Stark in the HBO adaptation of George R. R. Martin's Game of Thrones books. Some disability activists are concerned that Bran will be magically cured of his paralysis in the show's new season. Source: Helen Sloan

One of the main characters on HBO's hit series, Game of Thrones, is paralyzed. Another has lost his right hand. We've met an important character with a severe skin disorder and another with an intellectual disability.

And Peter Dinklage, the actor who comes first in the credits, is a little person. So is Rebecca Cokley, executive director of the National Council on Disability. She's a fan of the show — in

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR3 min read
'The Cave' Documentary Gives On The Ground Look At Syria's Civil War
The documentary follows a doctor at an underground hospital that was bombed by the Syrian government.
NPR3 min read
He Traded Single Life To Be Foster 'Pop' To More Than 50 Kids
Guy Bryant has fostered dozens of children over the past 12 years. At StoryCorps, he told one of his foster kids that he wants them to pass on what they've learned from him.
NPR4 min read
PHOTOS: Why Lynsey Addario Has Spent 10 Years Covering Maternal Mortality
The Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist, known for her work in war zones, turns to a topic that is often shied away from: the risks women face when giving birth.