Newsweek

How Quantum Physics Will Change Cybersecurity

Einstein called it "spooky action at a distance." Others call it the future of computing.
Quantum entanglement (the idea that pairs of particles separated even across great distances are inextricably linked) is key to developing tomorrow's secure communications channels.
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Quantum physics is an often mind-boggling branch of science filled with strange behavior and bizarre implications. For many people, the mere mention of the term is enough to send us hurtling in the opposite direction, like an electron bouncing off the center of an atom.

But evidence is mounting that the future of technology lies in quantum mechanics, which focuses on how the smallest things in our universe work. And a new breakthrough by scientists in China has just brought the world one very big step closer to this quantum revolution. Hundreds of miles closer, in fact. So it’s as good a time as any to understand why quantum physics is

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