NPR

Why Zika Is Especially Hard On The Women Of Brazil

They've been largely responsible for warding off mosquitoes at home — and caring for the children born with microcephaly. A new study says that the government has not given them the support they need.

Did the Zika virus put a heavier burden on women than it did on men when the virus swept through Brazil?

A new by Human Rights Watch argues that the answer is yes. It started with the task of keeping mosquitoes at bay — a task that often fell to the women and girls in a family. And it continues today with women shouldering much of the care for babies born with congenital Zika syndrome, which includes microcephaly, a birth

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