NPR

New Florida Law Lets Residents Challenge School Textbooks

The new bill was pushed by a conservative group critical of the way evolution, climate change and government were being taught in Florida schools.
A new Florida state law allows parents, and any residents, challenge the use of textbooks and instructional materials they find objectionable via an independent hearing. Source: Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova

Keith Flaugh is a retired IBM executive living in Naples, Fla., and a man with a mission. He describes it as "getting the school boards to recognize ... the garbage that's in our textbooks."

Flaugh helped found Florida Citizens' Alliance, a conservative group that fought unsuccessfully to stop Florida from signing on to Common Core educational standards.

More recently, the group has turned its attention to the books being, developed and pushed through by Flaugh's group, allows parents, and any residents, to challenge the use of textbooks and instructional materials they find objectionable via an independent hearing.

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