STAT

Armed with science (and snark), a gynecologist takes on Trump, Goop, and all manner of bizarre health trends

Careening between empathy, outrage, and snark, Dr. Jennifer Gunter presses a provocative crusade to protect women’s health and take down pseudoscience.

She tweets while she’s walking Luna, her nearly blind cat. (Yes, walking her. On a leash.) And while she’s at home, waiting for the sourdough to rise. She blogs while she’s directing her two teenage sons to fold the laundry.

In posts that careen between empathy, outrage, and snark, Dr. Jennifer Gunter presses a provocative crusade to protect women’s health, preserve reproductive freedoms — and, while she’s at it, dismantle all the dubious, dangerous medical advice she comes across in the wilds of the internet. (No, she recently explained to her male readers, you should not forgo condoms in favor of taping your penis shut during sex.)

Gunter, a Bay Area gynecologist, shot into the media spotlight in recent months by taking on actress Gwyneth Paltrow, whose lifestyle brand, Goop, peddles — among other gynecologically suspect “wellness” items — jade eggs that women are advised to tuck into their vaginas to improve their spiritual and sexual health. Gunter, mincing zero words, has repeatedly trashed Goop while portraying herself as a valiant defender of science.

But for Gunter, 55, jade eggs are hardly top of mind. She regularly takes on far more controversial topics in posts that sometimes lack women’s right to terminate pregnancies because of the fetus’s gender, blasted a college class that pushed , and has written frankly of her own struggles with and her anger at the media’s promotion of unrealistic body images.

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