The New York Times

A Feminist Defense of Bridezillas

Kelsey McKinney is a writer in Washington.

For many of the thousands of American weddings that have taken place so far this summer, there have been two unspoken requirements: 1) that the events be stunning, awe-inspiring, love-filled, unique and fun all at once, and 2) that they appear to have occurred miraculously, with zero effort or emotional output on the part of the bride.

The consequences of breaking the first rule are bad. Risks include an anemic hashtag, utterly forgettable vows and underwhelming Snapchat footage of a dance floor populated only by ring bearers and a few dutiful guests doing an unenthusiastic Wobble.

But the punishment for failing to live up to the second requirement is worse: A woman (nobody will be surprised to learn that this is

This article originally appeared in .

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