NPR

On The Internet, Everyone Knows 'You're A Racist': Twitter Account IDs Marchers

They weren't hiding their faces as they waved swastikas and shouted white supremacist and Nazi slogans. Now Internet sleuths are identifying (and misidentifying) the Charlottesville marchers.
Peter Cvjetanovic (right) chants while holding torches at a march organized by neo-Nazi, white supremacist and white nationalist organizations in Charlottesville, Va., on Friday night. / Getty Images

They didn't wear hoods as they chanted "Jews will not replace us." They weren't hiding their faces as they waved Confederate flags, racist signs and swastikas. They looked straight at a sea of cameras as they made the Nazi salute.

As Matt Thompson wrote for The Atlantic, the white supremacist march and rally this past weekend wasn't a KKK rally: "It was a pride march."

The bare-faced shamelessness was the point. But it was also an opening.

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