NPR

Oldest Kids In Class Do Better, Even Through College

Starting kindergarten later could boost kids' grades and improve their odds of attending a top college. Being the youngest kid in class can hurt their academic performance.
According to a new study, among families in the middle socioeconomic group the older, September-born kids were 2.6 percent more likely to attend college and 2.6 percent more likely to graduate from an elite university. Source: Rawpixel Ltd.

Children who start school at an older age do better than their younger classmates and have better odds of attending college and graduating from an elite institution. That's according to a new study from the National Bureau of Economic Affairs.

Many parents already delay enrolling their children in school,

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